Home » Canton And The Bogue: The Narrative of an Eventful Six Months in China by Walter William Mundy
Canton And The Bogue: The Narrative of an Eventful Six Months in China Walter William Mundy

Canton And The Bogue: The Narrative of an Eventful Six Months in China

Walter William Mundy

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270 pages
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Canton And The Bogue: The Narrative Of An Eventful Six Months In China By Walter William Mundy was published in London in 1875.The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable.MoreCanton And The Bogue: The Narrative Of An Eventful Six Months In China By Walter William Mundy was published in London in 1875.The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text.Contents:Chapter I. Marseilles To Suez — Chapter II. Suez — Aden — Galle — Chapter III. Singapore — Saigon — Hong-Kong — Chapter IV. A Short Résumé Of Chinese History — Chapter V. Some Remarks On Questions Suggested By Our Intercourse with China — Chapter VI. Hong-Kong — Chapter VII. Canton —Chapter VIII. Residence In Canton — Chapter IX. Religious Ceremonies — Chapter X. Something About Tea — Chapter XI. A Chinese Dinner — Chapter XII. Neighborhood Of Canton — Chapter XIII. The Spark Outrage — Chapter XIV. Review Of Piracy In China — Chapter XV. Suggestions As To Suitable Measures For Repressing Acts Of Piracy — Chapter XVI. The Typhoon Of 1874: — Chapter XVII. ConclusionExcerpts:.....The shortness of my stay in China may seem to make it presumptuous for me to attempt to relate to the public the little that I saw which may be new or interesting to them- but considering that on no point is there so much ignorance and misconception as on all things connected with the Chinese Empire, and that fewer books of real merit have appeared about it than upon any other question of equal importance, even what I have to say may prove, in its way, to be not without some interest, and my imperfect knowledge may be of some utility. The chief good I should anticipate from my own observations would be, that it would be setting an example to those in whom a longer residence in and acquaintance with the country, together with greater powers of discernment and description, would all combine to make them produce a book that should be at once interesting from the novelty of their facts, and instructive from the depth and penetration of their views and suggestions. This is of course far beyond my aspirations, and I shall be more than satisfied if I can with success play the humbler part of pointing out the way to those who could achieve a much more brilliant success......I will end as I commenced, by expressing that the highest reward I could possibly expect to result from what I have written would be to set an example that might be followed with more brilliant success by those more versed in Chinese life than myself. If in any way or on any single point my remarks have made something more comprehensible, or have put questions in a clearer light, my book has served its purpose, and I am content. To elucidate the hidden mysteries of any national character- to point in any way, be it never so slight, to a mode of making peoples better affected one towards the other- to view the actions of those we are brought in contact with so as to enable us to appreciate their virtues and condone their faults,—each one of these objects is sufficient to honor the attempt of anyone, were he even such an humble instrument of use as myself.